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When we find ourselves trying to make hard decisions, we often encounter the adage “go with your gut” or “trust your gut”, and recent studies have discovered that our gut microbiome just may affect how we think and behave.

Researchers have identified the vagus nerve, which runs from abdomen straight to the brain, as a crucial pathway in relaying communication between our gut and our brain. They found out that the chemistry of our gut biome affects how we think – from what we crave to how anxious we become.

In another study, a group of scientists and researchers discovered that our gut can “remember” situations and helps us create what appear to be complex decisions.

With these recent discoveries, it now becomes more important than ever to make sure that we take care of our gut. The physical health benefits of having a healthy gut are quite obvious – from proper absorption of nutrients, maintaining good weight, and even our day-to-day energy, and with these recent findings, even how we think and behave might see some improvement.

One of the safest ways to go about with taking care of our gut is getting a tailor-fit health program like the Optimal Gut CARE from BioBalance. Testing for the root cause of gut imbalance, clients then go on a 3-month program that involves 4 steps: C – cleansing the gut of irritants and unwanted microorganisms; A – activation of good bacteria to restore balance; R – repair and healing of the gut lining; and E – enhancing gut health through beneficial bacteria and nutrients.

So whether you’re feeling “hangry” or you’ve been getting butterflies in your stomach for a while, you might want to have your gut checked to make sure that the decisions you make are optimal and aren’t just a result of a microbe imbalance from within.

Click on the button below to know more about the Optimal Gut CARE Program from BioBalance.

SOURCES:

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/11/18/244526773/gut-bacteria-might-guide-the-workings-of-our-minds
https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2014/08/116526/do-gut-bacteria-rule-our-minds
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320749.php